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Miami Office

250 SW Lejeune Rd

Coral Gables, FL 33134 USA

305-444-7459

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Cutler Bay Office

18926 S. Dixie Hwy

Miami, FL 33157 USA

(305) 278-9677

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

North Miami Beach

290 NW 165 Street, Suite L 100

North Miami Beach, FL 33169 USA

(305) 949-1600

(305) 945-9768

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Miramar

14601 Hotel Road (SW 29th Street), Suite 210

Miramar, FL 33027 USA

954-414-0090

(954) 499-6646

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

The Laser Center of Coral Gables

TLC Affiliate 1099 SW LeJeune Rd.

Coral Gables, FL 33134 USA

(305) 461-0003

(305) 461-9633

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Galleria Office

2540 NE 9th Street

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304 USA

(954) 561-3533

(954) 565-9706

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Sunrise Office

14201 West Sunrise Blvd., Suite 101

Sunrise, FL 33323 USA

(954) 838-1382

(954) 838-9378

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Kendall Office

8000 SW 117 Avenue, Suite 203

Miami, FL 33183 USA

(305) 274-2022

(305) 275-2018

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Coral Gables Office

1097 SW LeJeune Road.

Coral Gables, FL 33134

(305) 461-0003

(305) 442-7098

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Hialeah Office

2140 W 68 Street, Suite 405

Hialeah, FL 33016 USA

(305) 823-1600

(305) 828-6750

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Eye Coordination

Image of an eyeball.

Each eye picks up a slightly different image, but through a process called fusion, the brain blends the images together to make one three-dimensional picture. Good eye coordination is needed, however, and allows the eyes to sustain proper alignment so that they can focus on practically the same image, though it is seen somewhat differently.

Causes of Poor Eye Coordination

For some, eye coordination is poor. It may be the result of immature eye muscle control or a defect in vision development. Because of this, the person must apply excessive force to try to keep the eyes aligned. Should poor eye muscle control be severe enough, the muscles cannot adjust the eyes enough for them to capture the same image, and double vision may be the outcome.

With double vision, the eyes and brain pick up two different images. To make up for this imbalance, the brain overlooks the visual it gets from the weaker, more impaired eye. And just like any body part that is not being used, its functions deteriorate. Thus, with the weaker eye no longer being depended upon for use, permanent visual impairment sets in. This can lead to a condition known as lazy eye or amblyopia, and signs of poor eye coordination may persist, including:

  • Difficulty reading and/or concentrating
  • Vertigo
  • Eye fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Poor performance of tasks

Vision therapy is one type of treatment used to assist with the correction of eye coordination problems. This form of physical therapy uses a mixture of vision exercises and specialized equipment to train the visual system to repair itself and reduce eye strain.

Treatment Options

Implemented under the guidance of an optometrist, vision therapy is performed in an office once to twice a week for up to an hour. Depending on the severity of the eye coordination problem and associated symptoms, the types of exercises and equipment will be tailored to meet the individual needs of the patient. These factors will also determine the number of sessions the patient requires. To complement in-house visits, the optometrist may also instruct the patient on how to perform certain vision exercises at home.

Devices that may be used during a vision therapy session include:

  • Therapeutic or corrective lenses
  • Optical filters
  • Prisms
  • Occluders or eye patches
  • Balance boards
  • Computer software
  • Vision-motor-sensory training equipment
  • Electronic target with programmed apparatuses

When vision therapy is complete, and all necessary sessions have ended, the patient’s visual skills and capabilities should have improved and symptoms should have decreased significantly. In addition, visual efficiency should have enhanced and the patient should be more efficient when it comes to processing and understanding visual information.