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Miami Office

250 SW Lejeune Rd

Coral Gables, FL 33134 USA

305-444-7459

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Cutler Bay Office

18926 S. Dixie Hwy

Miami, FL 33157 USA

(305) 278-9677

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

North Miami Beach

290 NW 165 Street, Suite L 100

North Miami Beach, FL 33169 USA

(305) 949-1600

(305) 945-9768

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Miramar

14601 Hotel Road (SW 29th Street), Suite 210

Miramar, FL 33027 USA

954-414-0090

(954) 499-6646

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

The Laser Center of Coral Gables

TLC Affiliate 1099 SW LeJeune Rd.

Coral Gables, FL 33134 USA

(305) 461-0003

(305) 461-9633

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Galleria Office

2540 NE 9th Street

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304 USA

(954) 561-3533

(954) 565-9706

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Sunrise Office

14201 West Sunrise Blvd., Suite 101

Sunrise, FL 33323 USA

(954) 838-1382

(954) 838-9378

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Kendall Office

8000 SW 117 Avenue, Suite 203

Miami, FL 33183 USA

(305) 274-2022

(305) 275-2018

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Coral Gables Office

1097 SW LeJeune Road.

Coral Gables, FL 33134

(305) 461-0003

(305) 442-7098

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Hialeah Office

2140 W 68 Street, Suite 405

Hialeah, FL 33016 USA

(305) 823-1600

(305) 828-6750

Monday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Diabetic Eye Diseases

image of the back of an eye

Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy includes several conditions that affect the light-sensitive layer of tissue on the back of the eye, known as the retina. This tissue is responsible for capturing light and passing on images to the brain.

There are two main types of diabetic retinopathy:

  • Nonproliferative retinopathy. This is the most common type. In this condition, the tiny blood vessels (capillaries) at the back of the eye swell and form pouches. As this condition gets worse, it can starve the retina of its blood supply.
  • Proliferative retinopathy. When the retina doesn’t get enough blood, new blood vessels grow. These tend to be weak and can leak blood, which can cause vision loss or blindness.

Diabetic retinopathy can also cause vision loss when fluid leaks into the macula, the part of the retina that is responsible for the sharp, central vision. The leakage of fluid can lead to swelling of the macula (macula edema) and blurred central vision.

Glaucoma

Diabetics have a higher risk of developing glaucoma than people without diabetes. This risk increases with age and the length of time that you’ve had diabetes.

Glaucoma causes pressure to build up inside the eye, often because the fluid in the eye drains more slowly. The increased pressure can squeeze the tiny blood vessels that feed the optic nerve and retina. Over time, this can damage these structures and lead to loss of vision.

Cataracts

Cataracts are another condition that affects diabetics more often than non-diabetics. In this condition, the lens of the eye becomes cloudy, which prevents some of the light from reaching the retina.

In its early stages, treatment for cataracts may involve the use of prescription lenses. As cataracts advance, however, surgery may become necessary to remove the cataractous lens, replace it with an intraocular lens implant (IOL) and restore vision.

If you suffer from diabetes, it is particularly important to keep all your yearly eye exams, so your eye doctor can monitor the health of your eyes. If you notice changes in your vision, contact us immediately, so we can help diagnose and treat any eye conditions you may have.